Long Term Recovery, Research and Care Highlighted at The Future of 9/11 Health 15 Year Commemorative Conference in Downtown Manhattan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

Mónica Novoa, NYCOSH

mnovoa@nycosh.org, cell: 929-366-5320

 

 

Long Term Recovery, Research and Care Highlighted at

The Future of 9/11 Health 15 Year Commemorative Conference in Downtown Manhattan

 

NEW YORK, NY – The Future of 9/11 Health 15 Year Commemorative Conference was held today in downtown Manhattan. The event was free and open to the public with participation from advocates, researchers, responders, survivors and medical experts from leading clinics and hospitals treating 9/11-related illnesses.

 

The conference highlighted health access and benefits for responders and survivors, the long term recovery and resiliency of responders and survivors and the future of 9/11 healthcare. Dr.  Michael Crane, Director of the World Trade Center Health Program Clinical Center of Excellence and Director of Selikoff Centers for Occupational Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai said, “Thanks to ongoing advocacy, federally funded care for WTC responders and survivors has come a long way in 15 years, from ‘screening only’ to state-of-the-art cancer treatment and prevention. We must continue to work together and continue that forward movement, so that the best of medical science remains freely accessible to every responder and survivor. Our heroes deserve no less.”

 

“Nearly 5,000 responders and over 700 survivors have a certified cancer under the WTC Health Program, which does not reflect those who have passed away or who are not currently enrolled in the program,” said Lee Clarke, NYCOSH Board Chair.

 

Less than 20% of the 400,000 responders and area workers and residents estimated to have been exposed to the many WTC-derived contaminants are enrolled in health program established and maintained by the Zadroga Act.

 

“It’s been a privilege to work with the men and women who bravely responded after our nation was attacked on 9/11/01 for the past fifteen years. Through providing medical care and developing the programs that are now covered by the Zadroga Act, I am amazed at their selflessness, fortitude and we, as a nation, remain eternally grateful for their sacrifice. Now our duty is to continue to provide medical care for the WTC responders,” said Dr. Jacqueline Moline, the Vice President and Chair, Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention at Northwell Health and Chair and Professor, Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.

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